35mm Film Price Guide

For Canada, US, EU, UK, Japan, and Thailand

14 min read by Dmitri. Published in Film, Photography.

Shopping for new film can be challenging. Especially if it’s something new and you are looking to get a good deal. Sticker prices for fresh stock can range anywhere between two and twenty dollars per roll. And there’s plenty of choices to get lost in.

There is no simple logic to this either. Amazon, for example, sells lots of film but the deals aren’t good unless you buy in palettes.

This guide will give you a solid idea on what a roll of film should cost. To create it I examined ten retailers and considered own experience at physical stores and labs, as well some feedback from the community. The result is a list of thirty-five 35mm film stocks and their prices in Canadian, US, EU, UK, Japanese, and Thai currencies.

To make this reference a little bit more interesting and informative, I’ve added short personal notes to each film listing. Sample images of said emulsions are at the bottom of this article.

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On average, film today costs about eight US dollars or just under eleven Canadian dollars per roll. With the most expensive emulsion being about five times as pricey as the cheapest stuff.

Note: a plus sign (+) means “and change.” For example, $8+ could be anywhere between $8.10—$8.90.

Tip: use your browser’s “search on page” feature to quickly find the film you are looking for.

Adox Silvermax 100.

CA $11US $8+€7+ £6+¥950฿280

If the store you’re shopping at is offering niche film selections, as in something other than Fuji, Kodak, or Ilford, it’s very likely to stock Adox Silvermax. This emulsion has two very interesting properties: an incredible exposure latitude of fourteen zones if developed in their prescribed chemistry, and an optional positive developing process, effectively letting you create black-and-white slides.

Agfa Vista 200.

CA $6US $4+€4£3+¥520฿150

This film has been my personal favourite and a classic, cheap colour film staple in Thailand and the UK. Unfortunately discontinued, but still available for sale in many places across the world. Personally, I feel that this is one of the better-looking emulsions on the market.

Agfa Vista 400.

CA $7US $5+€5£4 ¥600 ฿200

A slightly more expensive version of Agfa Vista: the discontinued, yet still available film stock. Because I’ve been buying this film for the price to quality ratio and shooting it with fast prime lenses, I typically don’t go for the ISO400 version. Especially since there isn’t much difference in colour, saturation, or grain between the two available speeds.

CineStill 800T.

CA $15US $12€10£9 ¥2100 ฿400

CineStill is particularly interesting for having no anti-halation layer, which results in an orange glow around lights in the night scenes. Even more peculiarly, this film is meant for specialized ECN-2 process. The team who brought it to still photography market adopted it for standard C-41 chemistry from the movie picture Kodak Vision line.

CineStill 50D.

CA $15US $12€10£9 ¥2100 ฿400

A slower, daylight-balanced cousin of 800T.

Fomapan Classic 100.

CA $6US $4.5€4£3+ ¥520 ฿150

A classic amongst students and monochrome film shooters on a budget. Low price does not suggest low quality in this Czech-made emulsion.

Fujifilm Fujichrome Provia 100F.

CA $18US $14€12£10 ¥1400 ฿450

A classic slide film emulsion for that fantastic contrast, extremely fine grain and true colour reproduction. Provia was introduced after Velvia emulsions. It is thought to have better colour management and easier to scan transparency. As of today, Fujifilm seems to be in the process of discontinuing all of its slide film lines. Once Provia and Velvia are off the shelves, they may remain gone forever. Let’s hope it isn’t so.

Fujifilm Fujichrome Velvia 100.

CA $19US $14+€12+£11 ¥1650 ฿480

Velvia has been pro photographers’ favourite for many years. This medium-low speed ISO stock comes with the strongest colour and contrast out of all Fuji E-6 slide film stocks.

Fujifilm Fujichrome Velvia 50.

CA $22US $17€14+£13 ¥1500 ฿550

The second most expensive film on this list. It has, perhaps, the finest grain out of all colour emulsions. The film produces a slightly lower contrast than Velvia 100 and, in my experience, tends to make a colder, finer colour palette.

Fujifilm Fujicolor C200.

CA $6US $4+€4£3+ ¥520 ฿150

One of the cheapest film stocks on the market. Some suspect this to be the film which Agfa has been repackaging and selling as Agfa Vista 200. That, however, is unconfirmed.

Fujifilm Fujicolor Industrial 100.

CA $9US $7€6£5 ¥770 ฿230

This film comes in white packaging with green lettering in Japanese. It’s cheap, grainy, has fantastic contrast, and tends to have pronounced blues and reds.

Fujifilm Fujicolor Natura 1600.

CA $25US $19€16+£14+ ¥2150 ฿630

This is it. The priciest roll of the list. Natura is another recently-discontinued line from Fuji. This emulsion isn’t particularly popular, or even well-known in the western market. However, I felt it was remarkable enough to be included in this list. Fun fact: Fuji had also produced a line of high-end compact cameras labelled Natura.

Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 400H.

CA $13US $10€8+£7+ ¥1120 ฿327

Comparable Kodak Portra line. This film is fairly easy to find online, though I tend to see it less often in physical stores.

Fujifilm Neopan Acros 100.

CA $13US $10€8+£7+ ¥1120 ฿350

This fine-grain black-and-white film is one of my personal favourites. The film comes with a silky-smooth texture due to the “finest grain” on the black-and-white emulsion. My favourite property of Neopan Acros, however, is the way it reacts to light. Specifically in high-contrast situations. There are rumours that Fujifilm may not, discontinue this stock (it has been announced to be cut from production in 2018).

Fujifilm Superia X-Tra 400.

CA $7US $5+€4+£4 ¥600 ฿200

A cheap colour film from Fujifilm. It seems to produce generally warmer tones than most Fuji colour stocks while retaining those signature bright reds.

Ilford Delta Professional 3200.

CA $ 13US $10€8+£7+ ¥1120 ฿350

When Kodak made noise in 2018 about bringing back T-Max P3200, Ilford teased that they never left, referring to this very film which they have been producing for some years continuously. Both are the fastest box speed emulsions.

Ilford Delta Professional 400.

CA $10US $7+€6+£6 ¥900 ฿250

A fine grain pro line of Ilford action film.

Ilford FP4 Plus 125.

CA $9US $7€6£5 ¥780 ฿230

A sharp, fine-grained medium-speed black-and-white film.

Ilford HP5 Plus 400.

CA $8US $6€5+£4+ ¥700 ฿200

An excellent emulsion for street photography. Though grainy it may be the right tool to capture the grittiness of daily human life.

Ilford Pan F Plus 50.

CA $11US $8+€7+£6+ ¥950 ฿280

This is a slow, fine-grained black-and-white film. Good for shallower depth of field in bright light and plenty of detail when enlarged.

Ilford XP2 Super 400.

CA $12US $9€8£7 ¥1050 ฿300

This is the black-and-white film that could be processed in C-41 (colour) chemistry. Since colour-only labs are more common, this emulsion could be the ticket to cheaper and faster turnaround time for monochrome negatives.

JCH StreetPan 400.

CA $12US $9€8£7 ¥1050 ฿300

This film is a high-contrast monochrome emulsion that Bellamy Hunt, also known as Japan Camera Hunter is sourcing directly from a factory that produces surveillance emulsions.

Kodak ColorPlus 200.

CA $6US $4+€4£3+ ¥520 ฿150

One of the cheapest 35mm colour film stocks out there. A classic.

Kodak Ektachrome E100.

CA $21US $16€14£12 ¥1800 ฿550

Ektachrome is back! Extremely fine grain, remarkably accurate colour reproduction, reacts well to pushing up to three stops. This slide film comes with remarkably wide exposure latitude.

Kodak Ektar 100.

CA $11US $8+€7+£6+ ¥950 ฿280

A colour negative that behaves almost like slide film; in my experience I found it to have a fairly narrow exposure latitude as compared to other colour negative films. Kodak Ektar is known to have the finest film grain, a strong contrast, and moderate to high saturation.

Kodak Portra 160.

CA $10US $8€6+£6 ¥900 ฿250

Portra is a premium film line from Kodak with droves of fans around the world. Fine grain and natural tones. I find it to have a little narrower exposure latitude and forgiveness than what I usually like for this speed, however. If overexposed, it may colour shift towards teal.

Kodak Portra 400.

CA $11US $8+€7+£6+ ¥950 ฿280

The higher-speed Portra is sufficiently different from the 160 version — and not just in sensitivity. This film is generally easier to photograph with and scan. The results are often a bit more forgiving in terms of exposure.

Kodak Portra 800.

CA $ 13US $10€8+£7+ ¥1120 ฿350

Portra 800 is not necessarily well-suited for night photography, despite its high ISO number. It is, however, a great daylight film that brings fantastic details out in the shadows and is quite suitable for overcast days and dim lighting. It is more grainy than its slower speed counterparts, although it tends to have a pleasant texture, especially in the bright areas.

Kodak T-Max 100.

CA $8US $6€5+£4+ ¥700 ฿200

Fine grain, sharpness, all of it. T-Max is a proprietary technology Kodak has developed which changes the way silver halide crystals align themselves, resulting in better-resolving emulsions.

Kodak T-Max 400.

CA $8US $6€5+£4+ ¥700 ฿200

One of the finest-grained high-speed black-and-white films on the market. Similar, but not the same, as Ilford Delta series.

Kodak T-Max P3200.

CA $12US $9€8£7 ¥1050 ฿300

A seemingly higher-contrast version of Ilford Delta Professional 3200 for the ridiculous light sensitivity, only recently brought back from the dead by Kodak. When buying film this sensitive, consider that you will need a good light meter to match its tolerance in the dark.

Kodak Tri-X 400.

CA $8US $6€5+£4+ ¥700 ฿200

This is one of the topmost favourite emulsions by monochrome photographers. A balance of contrast, grain, and versatility.

Kodak UltraMax 400.

CA $7US $5+€4+£4 ¥600 ฿200

Cheap, widely-available, fast colour film.

Kosmofoto Mono 100.

CA $8US $6€5+£4+ ¥700 ฿200

Kosmofoto Stephen Dowling’s branded emulsion. Undoubtedly, one of the prettiest film packages on any shelf. You should know that this is a rebranded emulsion, similar to how Agfa Vista is a rebranded Fuji film.

Rollei RPX 25.

CA $10US $7+€6+£6 ¥900 ฿250

A sharp, low-speed, high-contrast film. The slowest film of the bunch.

Findings.

The most expensive rolls are consistently the slide film varieties, including CineStill. The cheapest are the sadly the discontinued Agfa Vista 200 along with the still steadily produced Fomapan Classic 100, Fujifilm Fujicolor C200, and Kodak ColorPlus 200.

On average, film today costs about eight US dollars or just under eleven Canadian dollars per roll. With the most expensive emulsion being about five times as pricey as the cheapest stuff. Although it may be tougher to find cheaper stuff than Agfa Vista and Fomapan, unless you bulk-roll, there is plenty of boutique, rare, discontinued and expired stuff that may be bought on the cheap. If you are looking to get a solid sample pack of small-batch film, check out Analogue Wonderland. Their parcel packaging is fantastic.

To get the numbers for this price guide, I’ve looked at Analogue Wonderland, Buy Film Canada, Film Photography Project, Lens and Shutter, Adorama, Amazon, BH Photo, Freestyle Photo, Macodirect, and Walmart.

Kodak Ektar, Kodak Portra 800, and Ilford FP4 Plus were the only three films consistently stocked across all of the above stores.

Typically, you’d be paying about a dollar more for each additional stop of sensitivity, though in many instances there would be no price difference. In case of Fuji Velvia, you’d pay more than $3 extra for one less stop of speed.

☝︎Further reading:Analogue Wonderland: Building a Store for Film Photographers, Online” by Paul.

Cheapest film possible.

If you are looking to get the cheapest film possible, this might not be the right guide for you. What I suggest you do instead is learn how to bulk-load. It involves buying one hundred feet worth of film at a time and transferring it into canisters using a loading tool. This may cut your costs in half with some varieties.

Film sample appendix.

This guide is designed to be an easy reference of film prices and a quick advice on possible uses — without having to scroll too much. For that reason all of the sample images are compiled in this section rather than being added inline.

Note that I have not personally tried every film in this list, yet.

Agfa Vista 200.
CineStill 800T.
Fujifilm Fujichrome Provia 100F.
Fujifilm Fujichrome Velvia 100.
Fujifilm Fujichrome Velvia 50.
Fujifilm Fujicolor C200.
Fujifilm Fujicolor Industrial 100.
Fujifilm Fujicolor Natura 1600.
Fujifilm Neopan Acros 100.
Ilford HP5 Plus 400.
Kodak ColorPlus 200.
Kodak Ektachrome E100.
Kodak Ektar 100.
Kodak Portra 160.
Kodak Portra 400.
Kodak Portra 800.
Kodak T-Max P3200. Developed at ISO 800, shot with green filter.

December 13, 2018: Thank you Steve@ロッテを優勝させるぞ!! for the price corrections aimed at Japanese retail for Velvia 50, Provia, and CineStill film.

March 18, 2019: Thank you -soupxsoup- for suggested corrections on Portra, Ektar, and CineStill films.